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're great. you don't believe it? let's make it happen. >> people talk about how america is in certain collapse. any time you go to europe, i love europe. i'm not going to talk about the chocolate makers, but when you go to europe and especially great britain, you don't get the sense of optimism you don't get when you land back here in america. i heard you talk about the force multiplier. you multiply that 300 million times over, what a powerful force. >> i spend a lot of time out in the countryside talking to all kinds of audiences. trade associations and financial organizations and they are all worried about the economy and the unemployment rate. they haven't lost confidence. they are hustling and trying to make a living so that people make a better living for their families. don't count this place out. it will never be out. >> the second rule runs counter to what the reality is in washington right now. get mad and then get over it. you talked about how politics is not a zero sum game. your friend 90% of the time is not your enemy 10% of the time. >> i tell a story about a disagreeme
the kingdom of heaven. >> difficult images, difficult words for these dark days in america. we begin this afternoon as the first of many funerals are held in newtown, connecticut. the beginning of what will prove to be a parade of ceremonies laying to rest beautiful young children and their dedicated young teachers who became the victims of a senseless and unspeakable act of violence. children like 6-year-old noah pozner, smart as a whip, gentle but rambunctious, mourned by his twin sister ariel who was in a different classroom and survived. jack pinto, also 6, loved skiing, baseball, and football and was a big fan of the new york giants, especially victor cruz. the star receiver wore the boy's name on his cleats and gloves in tribute during the giants game sunday night. as a nation grapples with how and why these many young lives were cut brutally short, it fell to the president in newtown last night to face the impossible task of consoling a town that lay in emotional ruins. >> i can only hope it helps for you to know that the you're not alone in your grief. that our world, too, ha
cash rewards card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. >>teve: this is probably going to bug you, people of afghanistan are supposed to be allies, right. >> brian: not according to their president karzai. listen. >> policies coming to us from terrorism and the taliban. it is partly coming to us from the structures that nato and traded in afghanistan. >> brian: our time and mon yesacrifices are a waste? >> steve: joining us is the army veteran for america. good morning to you. president karzai is blaming united states and nato for violence and corruption in afghanistan. he sounds a little >> yes, it is a nice posen pill to look at. i was in a
there that makes of america. the more we reflect the middle, the better off our committee will be and i think the service we provide will be better. >> what gives you that hope? >> a lot of people are recognizing the pathway we are on will not help. more and more members are talking with me where we discuss with one another how we can improve the place. i hear it almost every day. i encourage it. >> there are people who believe partisanship is a good thing because ideology and the direction of the country moves in the way they want. for example, people have come in with the tea party. what do you think of these hyper-partisan groups outside of the congress that attempt to exert their influence? >> one of the more fascinating experience i have had involves a gathering. my first meeting a couple years ago, with tea party types. my staff was concerned about this new group. i said, give me their telephone numbers. i invited them to our session. they were there that evening to express their concern about health care being nationalized and taking over that piece of their personal life. they were no
specialist tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 will help you get started today. >>> look at shares of bank of america. 1015 is where it is trading right now. firmly above $10 mark. watch for a firm close above 10 and that will give them hope that perhaps they can stay and go higher at this point. watching the stock along with other bank stocks off of news from citigroup. citi laying off 11,000 people. >> starbucks card for the 1% has arrived. at least that is what some are calling the new $450 starbucks gift card made from steel. it comes loaded with 400 bucks, cost $50 to make and only 5,000 of them will be sold exclusively through luxury online retailer gilt.com and that sale starts friday in case you wanted to buy one. >> i think i probably will. >> really? >> 50 bucks to make a steel card? >> you get $400 worth of coffee. >> it cost $450. it cost $50 to make the card. >> can you get -- i assume you can get it replenished? >> that's a good question. >> if you want to use it again. >> i'll probably pass. steel card is heavy. >> i was thinking about how much it would weigh in your pocket. >> maybe by u.s.
, philadelphia, new york city, boston, the most congested corridor in the united states of america, that is the only 600 miles that we really own. we another small stretches around the commuter -- all the rest of amtrak service, over 20,000 miles of private freight rail. i see the main rail people in the audience and they have concerns too about using theirs and not having dedicated them and we need to address that issue as we move forward. final point is northeast quarter is where we should be putting the focus. give the administration credit for at least taking the money that has been turned back dedicating so that to the northeast quarter but we are doing it in a piecemeal, half baked fashion. the northeast corridor, every state, every major area can benefit by bringing high-speed rail to the northeast corridor. 70% of our air traffic delays emanate from the northeast corridor even when we have next-generation air traffic control, move planes faster and closer together with doubling of air-traffic, all of the other restrictions we have in that corridor, you must have high-speed
destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and central america is now a star performer. first, we want to get the latest news. looking for confidence out of germany's ifo survey. if we can put it up on the screen, that would be a help as i'm working to get it up at the moment. as soon as we get the numbers on that front, i will bring them to you. looks like we're still waiting on that. in the meantime, send in your thoughts, questions and comments about the program to worldwide@cnbc.com. and the biggest news of the morning, we have a deal. after 14 hours of talkes and months of negotiations, an agreement has been reached on a pan european banking supervisor. european finance ministers say they've drawn up plans to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting went into the late hours of the night. it sounds like the uk and sweden got their way. how significant is t
states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives. sir, pursuant to the permission granted in clause 2-h of rule 2 of the rules of the us us house of representatives, the clerk received the following message from the secretary of the senate on december 21, 2012, at 4:04 p.m. that the senate agreed to the conference report accompanying the bill, h.r. 4310. with best wishes i am signed sincerely, karen l. haas. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, when the house adjourns today it shall adjourn to meet at 20:00 p.m. on thursday, december 27, 2012. without objection, the committees may have until the end of the second session to file the final report pursuant to clause 1-b of rule 11, and the chair of the committee in consultation with its ranking ranking member before filing such report may update report to reflect committee or house action taken after the report was ordered reported o
silence except for the television. it is america's biggest problem. and on that cheerful note, thank you very much. [applause] >> next, and to raise with to retiring members of congress. dan burton of indiana talks about his 30 years in congress. followed by senator kent conrad on his 26-year career. and a discussion on corporations and stock values. dan burton is retiring from the house this year after 30 years in office. the 15-term congressman represents the fifth district in east central indiana which includes parts of indianapolis and the surrounding suburbs. earlier he talked with c-span about his past investigations of the collective demonstration and the oversight ruled congress. this is 30 minutes. as you exit the institution how would you say it stated? >> it has changed a great deal. it is not the same as when i came 1983. there seemed to be more comedy. tip o'neill was speaker. i will never forget he was the first time he was on the floor raising cane with democrats. he had someone take his place and he came down and started giving me the dickens. after that we bec
in a financial crisis and ms. lagarde, who heals from tax the rich, 75% france is lecturing america, very interesting. >> meanwhile, european markets are down and because the italian prime minister mario monti m a surprise. is going to resign. and silvio berlusconi wants to replace him. europe is appalled. and people blaming the recession for not having more children. 64 births for one thousand women of child bearing age. half of the peak of the baby boom in the 1950's. our next guest has six children, counts them. and what's that-- >> and naham segal. that works. >> have i got that word? >> and light tte candles. >> if you light them i will come. >> you have six children. >> as do you. >> leave me out of this. >> and others people say they can't afford it you're saying it doesn't matter if you can afford them or not. >> if the price tag of having a child scares you the most, you haven't done the right gut test. stuart: so, go ahead and have the children whether you can afford them or not. >> having children is the investment in the future. if we don't have children now and understanding
. stuart: a question for you. >> go ahead. stuart: in america we say you have goose bumps when you're very cold. in england we say you're hen-fleshed. are you either this morning? >> i am both, put together. times a hundred. stuart: excellent. >> i look like rudolph with my nose. stuart: may i recommend you wear a hat and i'm losing my hair and-- >> i do, i have a hat with me as well as ear warmers just not for this hit. can i tell you some things going on behind me today? >> no, don't have time, sorry. that's the way it is. >> i was going to tell you about the drunken revellers and their bathroom experiences, i guess you don't want to know. stuart: you should hear what they're saying, no more drunken revellers, no time. wrap up, keep warm, young lady, i mean it. >> thank you very much happy new year to you. stuart: happy new year to you, lauren. and on thursday, president obama signed an executive order that ends a pay freeze for congress and federal workers that is. as our march this coming here, federal employees will see 1/2% to 1% pay increase and get this, 535 members of congress wil
, physical consistency. i will focus on bans of america and arguments can certainly be in other cases. i will argue the five most prominent arguments in favor of banning of a gurkha automating consistency in ways that favor majority practice -- the idea of equal respect for all people from which this spring as. all cases of what might turn to the christian tradition against itself called cases of seeing demoting your brother's eye while failing to appreciate the large plank in your own eyes, all target situations alleged to be present in muslim communities failing to note their ubiquity in the worst form in the majority culture. let's look at how each is treated with equal respect. first, is an argument that holds security requires people to show their face when appearing in public places. a second closely related argument which i will treat with that says that the argument of transparency, it says the kind of transparency and reciprocity proper to relations between citizens is impeded by covering part of the face. what is wrong with both of these arguments is they are applied totally in
that everybody could relate to and so she'd become one of america's most celebrated a beloved authors in the silent spring turned a very different direction. "silent spring" is a disturbing book, a worrisome book to point that what we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. since it's not 1962 anymore, i thought i would explain more for you about who rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in the house in springfield, pennsylvania. when a person was born in the upstairs bedroom of the house, at the time did not have the addition on the brick inside. very simple, very modest house, four runs. two downstairs and two bedrooms upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couple of couple of outhouses out that. a shed in the front of vacation i kept it worse and there was a little bit out of the west.??? there is enough property around the house that carson could explore the woods, often with her mother as a child and she looked birds and animals and was fascinated from a very early age. she was a gifted student and a talented
. >> why can't you be a made in america company? >> you know, this i found, as a matter of fact, the engine in here is made in america. and not only are the engines in here made in america, but engines are made in america and are exported. the glass on this phone is made in kentucky. so we have been working for years on doing more and more in the united states, next year, we will do one of our existing mac lines in the united states. >> you can see the entire interview with tim cook tonight on rock center, that's 10:00 eastern time on your local nbc station, but for now investors are watching the market. apple shares 5.31, which is close to the main lows. this is close to the next s support level on the stock and really catching a lot of people by surprise. >> it's a fiscal cliff decline. this is the greatest capital gains generator of our lifetime. i would love to see what the gains are going to be next year. but i would be saying you need to sell it. we have no idea where the capital gains are going to go, we're going to go over the fiscal cliff, what do you have to lose, the rates are go
newman on the november jobs report and a discussion about public health in america with national institute of allergy director. washington journal begins live each morning, 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine but we have not coordinated care, and all these services we have end up having so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we're treating, and you got to step back and ask, are we hurting people overall? on a global level, what are we doing sometimes? and of course, now we've got these reports saying, 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in healthcare? when we step back 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures, this is something i think which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health care name. by unaccountable" on c-span 2. >> writer institute. i think a writer's institute is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices, words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision thi
of america, merrill lynch recently held a 38% stake in hertz. after the offerings, the funds will hold a roughly 26% interest in the rental business. after the sales, hertz will not receive anything from the proceeds of the sale. coming up, squawk on the farm. we're going to talk crops, crops, crops, tractors and other equipment. and what it all tells us about the global economy. stay tuned. >> announcer: team, "squawk box" exclusive coverage of the "new york times" deal book conference. investing, the economy and the looming fiscal cliff. jpmorgan chairman and ceo jamie dimon, carl likely group co-founder david rubenstein and a lot more. it all starts tomorrow at 6:00 a.m. eastern. hi, i'm phil mickelson. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. because enbrel, etanercept, suppresses your immune s
in this country. we're generating jobs that are in america and a proves america's competitive position. -- and it improves america's competitive position. to me that should be a high priority. >> i would like to conclude with a question on your tenure. 26 years in the senate. he made the point that we now -- you made the point that we now have a partisan divide that is pretty vicious. from your experience, what can be done? what can be done and work for them that would correct the bitter partisan divide and allow the two parties to work together in the national interest on a more regular basis? >> one thing that would help is to elect more centrists. second, if the two parties met together in caucuses periodically. right now both sides caucus every week. most of that is focused on partisan advantage. i think it would be enormously useful if there were caucuses focused on the senate because of size where all senators met periodically in a caucus setting without the benefit of the media. i'm sorry. i think as we caucus now behind closed doors, i think a meeting of senators -- republicans
to change anything. they do not want to help america. what people are they for? the people have spoken, but they do not ever listen to the people. what people are the working for? host: james in new york as a deadline for independents. caller: i just want to point out something. 400% to 1000% increase in salaries versus the workers for the so-called job creators, along the way, the people are not making these increases in salaries. they talk about cutting taxes on the wealthy. well, what about giving money -- a fair percentage of an increase to the people that are doing the work? i never hear anything about that. it just seems to me that the unfairness starts there. host: that is james and new york. the lead story in this morning's boston globe with the headline "modest hope." [video clip] >> i just had a good and constructive discussion with senate and house leadership about how to prevent the tax hike on the middle class. i am optimistic that we may be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses of in time. senators harry reid and mitch mcconnell are working on such an agree
to our sanity. what about our economy. ♪ it's a family affair >> live from america's news headquarters, hi, everybody, i'm jamie colby. this news in, one of al-qaeda's top leaders reportedly caught and says that al-abi was arrested in southern yemen. and we're told he's responsible for the murder of security officials and other terrorist attacks in yemen. a delicate cleanup is underway right now after a freight train derails on a new jersey bridge, toppling four tanker cars and spewed thousands of gallons of the chemicals. and the accident happening in paulesboro, an industrial town directly across the river and dozens still recovering and hundreds of others waiting to be let back in the their homes and crews are working to clean up and the crash under investigation. i'm jamie colby, back now to cavuto on business, keep it here on the fox news channel, the most powerful name in news. ♪ >> and that crowd you recently had over for thanksgiving dinner, it's like my in-laws, they're still there. and for the crowd, yet, stays over forever. do you think that's a stretch? i want you to thi
marzullo, abc7 news. >>> stay with abc news and "good morning america" lara spencer is in london she will have a live report at 7:00. >>> 6:36. traffic and weather together, next. live look outside, you are looking at san mateo bridge traffic zipping along without trouble. dry out there now except for a few sprinkles up north. mike will have the full forecast. sue is checking traffic. >>> painkillers taken from a peninsula drugstore. the similarities this case has to another >>> welcome back. live doppler 7 hd showing you the last three hours and how radar returns are more plentiful the farther west you go. it is looking out 100 miles out watching this wall of lighter rain towards bodega bay, santa rosa, guerneville over the next two to three hours. visibilities fairly unlimited for the rest of us, cloudy, best chance of rain steady rain north bay during the afternoon, 50s, the rest of us mostly cloudy, scattered sprinkle and low to mid 60s. have the wet weather gear up north. >>> muni metro back on schedule after power problems overnight that's the good news. bart says they are on t
us today. jenna: "america live" starts right now. megyn: fox news alert, the world on edge and the u.s. and its allies potentially on the brink of entering another war in the middle east to prevent syria from doing the unthinkable. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm megyn cel by. just days after he first reported on concerns syria was actually mixing chemical weapons that could kill thousands of people at a time, we get word that the regime has loaded the nerve agent into bombs that could be dropped, we don't know when. the president earlier this here, our president, called chemical weapons use a, quote, red line that would get an immediate response from the united states, and here's what the white house said about it moments ago. >> to the administration any more urgent than 48 hours ago? >> i think we've been clear all week about our concern -- well, probably longer than that, but since this has been a heighten, an issue that's getting heightened attention, we have made clear, i think, in very stark terms our concern about it. i wouldn't want to characterize our assessments b
's go where we have good labor relations in the united states of america -- the wages are reasonable. >> greta: are the big companies, though, are they the one who is are union busting? if they are only going to go to those states and put some governors up against the wall, in order to compete -- >> sure. they are going to get the best deal. here's where i agree with the union guys. nafta, gatt, they are magna carta for transcontinental corporations to shut down the united states, where they have high wages and the high regulations and move it over to china, cut your wage rate by 80%, produce there, bring the products back into the united states and then the huge new profits you make, share those with your shareholders and the executives. and that's where i disagree this globalization, free trade. they have really been unfair. one place i agree with hoffa. he was with me in the 90s. they are bringing mexican trucks into the united states, driving them on american highways, mexican drivers into rounder-cut american teamsters. i think that's wrong. i think the teamsters -- >> greta: ye
20 years, as many as 60,000 russian orphans found homes in america. but isolated cases of abuse by adoptive parents in the u.s. have caused public outcries in russia. this person was abandoned by his american adoptive mother and sent back to moscow. supporters of the bill say that russia should foster its own. >> if there is any doubt there are not adequate levels of safety for children in the u.s., it is serious grounds for suspension and a ban of adoption. unfortunately, the current position of the authorities in america shows their indifference to the fate of russian children. >> russia's own track record is poor. over 7000 children were adopted by russians in 2011, but more than half were rejected, returned to orphanages in the same time frame. with many child welfare groups in russia critical of the band, some in the kremlin have said the legislation should not be rushed into. a third reading of the bill is expected in the duma friday. ultimately, it will be up to president putin to decide whether it is a step too far. >>> russian police have tried to keep the pros and anti
. >> america had a moment of silence for the victims of the newtown massacre. exactly one week ago, a young man armed with a semiautomatic rifle gunned down 20 people in connecticut. meanwhile, the national rifle association has taken a hard- nce on the issue, calling for armed security guards in yev american school to protect students. >> the gun owner's organizatitin has proposed the establishment of a national school shield program, saying a bad guy with a gun can only be stopped by a good guy with a gun. the head of the inner raymond it clear that the nra opposes new gun laws. pro-gun control activists twice disrupted the press conference in washington. russian president vladimir putin has made sharp comments about a european energy law, saying it causes confusion and undermined trust. russia is the biggest exporter of energy to europe. >> putin was speaking in brussels, where he has been holding talks with eu leaders. his first visit after he was reelected. although russia and the you are close trading partners, there are various contentious issues which divide them. >> vladimir putin did
to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood! ♪ - hi, neighbour! come on in! i can't wait to go play at jungle beach today! and... prince wednesday's here! - hello, hello, hello. it's me, prince wednesday. i have my royal pail, and i have my royal shovel, and i'm
in little america of the war within the war for afghanistan, washington post senior correspondent reports on the military and government failings in the war in afghanistan. nancy gives him an editor at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it
didn't have enough in our operations, that we didn't have enough in asia and latin america, africa and the middle east and europe. some some of our clients have got 40%, 45%, 50% and they benefit as a result. the other part of it is i wish we had not just one-third of our operations in digital here on cnbc and that we had, let's say, 40%, 45% there, too. the pattern you'll see in 2013 is meets ya, application to our business and we specifically are going to get people to work more and more together in order to deliver more effective and efficient advertising and communications for our clients. >> if you have any regrets, share them with us here. >> never have regrets. >> learn from it. yeah. >> louisa will help you learn from it. e-mail your regrets into the show. we'll examine just where oil prices might be headed in 2013. >>> president obama calls congressional leaders to the white house today. >>> a lackluster trading week of the yurp, ewe european equity markets are scheduled to post double digit results for 2012. >> italy is expected to see solid demand when it sells up to 6 b
: well, father, i think america is in mourning and i think the mood is somber and reflective and we appreciate you being with us today, father jonathan morris and your message there, we appreciate it, sir. >> thank you. >> it's monday morning and training has just begun for the new week, where are we? up 33 points. and maybe speaker boehner making an offer about the fiscal cliff negotiations, maybe he's saying, look, you can tax pat a higher rate incomes over a million dollars a year and maybe that helps market sentiment? we're up 43 points in the very early going. to nicole, google shares are higher. what's this, another analyst raising a price target, is this what happened? >> we're doing the analyst morning for you. you know what? really, take aside what the number is. it just shows you what wall street is thinking. so, if you just take that message, that will give you a clear indication of which way the stocks may be going. so, in in case, ever core partners is looking there and raising the price target to $850 from 830 and they have an overweight rating and so, this basically i
that to america where 45% of the total population gets out of bed and goes to work. according to the wall street journal, in greece total economic activity is down 20% in the past four years. this is a country in financial ruin. the question, how can a country of 11 million repay a 1/2 trillion dollars worth of debt and it's hard to think they could ever recover. heart breaking for someone of greek heritage like our own nicole petallides, it's a dreadful siiuation. >> it is heart breaking and i was hoping, glad you didn't make me do it, trying to throw greece under the bus. the truth is the country is suffering greatly. and grandparents trying to support their sons, daughters, grandchildren all on one pension and many of europeans, they have a different mentality, in certain ways, retiring, off the government and that's not the greeks here in the states, willing to work 25 hours a day. and there's certainly a different mentality there, but they are suffering greatly. one gentleman, nobody talks, but the cemetery, very sad and solemn. stuart: that's a personal side % of the greek tragedy story. n
, the america the peopley a significant majority, the problem is a spinning problem. but not ex blessively a spending problem. they have come up with comprehensive plans that rely on spending reductions than tax increasing overtime, they achieve t spending reduction through comprehensive social security reforms and tax reforms, to get the revenues that is the pathway forward. and but again, i think we have to be realistic, we don't have a lot of time left. let'focus on what we need, avoid fiscal cliff, a credible down payment in regard to revenues and spending, it has to have a more spending element than we see right now. and targets, spending in revenues to achieve a grand bash an next year. neil: thank you very much, wall street is giving up. dow futures off almost 300 points, if you are getting a sense of de. deja vu you are not alone. remember when they rejected tarp 1, it was shot down, and stocks went way down, the dow tumbling better than 770, congress quickly reconvened, took out there are tarp vote to avoid door dow fall off, it was thought it safi the day, what happened, the dow
. >> absolutely. we work too hard. france and italy six weeks is normal. john: america does not have mandatory vacation but we have 170,000 pages of federal rules and they keep passing more. it shows how america has recovered since the great depression. to sit out this graph from dan mitchell because of these rules add this up and the government spending, tax increase coming can understand when our entrepreneurs think i do not want to hire people then i want to keep my company small then i am stuck with a mandate. i am worried we become like you're up at the same time that model is falling apart. john: we did have these laws but not as many. >> as much as seven like the regulated laissez-faire economy just make sure you have enough breathing room to prosper. over time if government grows faster than a private sector that wedge means the burden of gdp, it is not like one straw causes it to collapse, but there is a tipping point*. are we five years away from being greece or italy? twenty years? i don't know. this trendline is bad. happening under bush and obama. it does not work. john: good inte
and italy six weeks is normal. john: america does not have mandatory vacation but we have 170,000 pages of federal rules and they keep passing more. it shows how america has recovered since the great depression. to sit out this graph from dan mitchell because of these rules add this up and the government spending, tax increase coming can understand when our entrepreneurs think i do not want to hire people then i want to keep my company small then i am stuck with a mandate. i am worried we become like you're up at the same time that model is falling apart. john: we did have these laws but not as many. >> as much as seven like the regulated laissez-faire economy just make sure you have enough breathing room to prosper. over time if government grows faster than a private sector that wedge means the burden of gdp, it is not like one straw causes it to collapse, but there is a tipping point*. are we five years away from being greece or italy? twenty years? i don't know. this trendline is bad. happening under bush and obama. it does not work. john: good intentions and that go bad. clean energ
? this is big news. >>> playing politics with america's fiscal future. >> we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. >> they would like to go beyond that or do it differently. >> but we're rising above it and putting your money first. guest host david walker of comeback america initiative and democratic strategist steve mcmahon both here to help us find solutions. >> then, what goldman's jim o'neill is so he seeing to help you prepare for your investments straight ahead. plus, adding opportunities door to door. >> have a good day. >> thank you. >>> domino's pizza ceo patrick doyle is here. the second hour of "squawk box" begins right now. >> good morning, everybody. welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen. andrew is out this week. we've been watching futures this morning and they are indicated slightly higher. dow futures are up about 35 points above fair value, s&p futures and the fass dak futures are higher, as well. in your morning headlines today, the fiscal cliff dominating the sunday talk show circuit. treasury secretary tim geithner expressing on meet
. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> welcome back to "the kudlow report." in this half hour, michigan is really doing it. the statehouse just passed a bill to make that union stronghold a right-to-work state. we are about to talk to governor rick snider object it. . >>> and has a recession already started? believe it or not, that's the forecast of lakshman achuthan. he says it started in july. we're going to press him on all that. >>> now, a movement started by american majority action called fire boehner has been trending on twitter. . but there's really not one wit of serious evidence that mr. boehner has any problems holding on to his speakership or even conservative leaders in the house. here now to try to make this weak case is ron meyer. ron, first of all, i want to say that i commend john boehner for his valiant attempts to stop the fiscal cliff and to make a deal without giving up growth principles. but when y
was prohibited in america, al capone and the gangsters existed. and all that money went into the underworld. people were being arrested for drinking alcohol. they were being put in prison. the united states realized that was not a sensible option, and the moment they legalized it, the taxes went into health and education. people stopped getting arrested and put in prison. the underworld went away. you know, i think the global drug commission believes that if you take the same approach to say something like marijuana, it's likely to work. what they're saying is that let certain states experiment with it. let's see what happens. we don't believe that, you know, the health issues of the public will be any worse than they currently are, because people could readily get marijuana any way, almost anywhere. >> let's talk about your expertise in space. what is your next big adventure? are you still intent on going to space and leading space tourism? when does that happen? >> i said i wanted to get high, didn't i? >> you want to get high, real high. >> i want to get real high. we're very, very close
in history and we all know it on so many different fronts, he changed the way america thinks. and it's quite a gift that he had, that he gave to the country. so for both of them, it has been just an enormous privilege for all of us to serve with you. and i think everyone on both sides of the aisle know there was greatness in our delegation and that it was an honor, john and barney, to have been able to serve with you. and thank you so much. and i yield back the balance of my time. mr. burton: madam speaker, let me just follow up on what was just said and say that barney frank and i had a lot of differences over the years, but we also found times we could work together and we co-sponsored a bill together one time. barney and your colleague, i wish you both the very best and hopefully we will run into each other. let me make a couple of comments to my two colleagues who are going to follow me on this special order who told me if i talked too long they will hit me in the head with a ball bat. i want to say a couple of things. daniel inouye, senator inouye, i never met, but i read in the paper m
just use my bank of america debit or credit card when i pay. and then i get up to 15% cash back... put into my account! i know, right? [ male announcer ] introducinbankamerideals, free for online banking customers. sign in to your online banking to choose your deals today. >> gretchen: 16 minutes after the top of the hour. if you are just waking up. it is usually a symbol of pride and patriotism. but the new flag polls seen in iran have a sinister meaning. the flag poles are electronic attenas used to jam communication and block their citizens from getting internet tv and radio signals. why? here with more is disa. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> gretchen: you have inside sources in the country of iran, why would they wanting to fool their citizens as to the real mission of the flag poles. >> the biggest threat to the regime since 2009 when the iranian government was caught off guard and saw the large presence on the internet and getting information from outside of the country and sending information from inside out. it was the twitter rev -- revolution. they were using youtube
areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. look this isn't my first christmas. these deals all seem great at the time... but later... [ shirt ] merry christmas, everybody! not so much. ho ho ho! this isn't that kind of deal. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> good morning. welcome, everybody. you're watching "starting point." republicans have come out with their version of what a fiscal cliff solution
from terrorism. part of the insecurity is coming to us from the structures that america created in afghanistan in the private security firms. the contractors that they promoted at the cost of afghan people. and the way they behaved with afghan people and the anger that has caused in the afghan people, and the resulting insecurity. >> would you say you believe that some of these would be intentional insecurity brought by nato in the united states? >> there is a very strong perception that some of that insecurity is intentional, yes. >> reporter: and when i asked him if he trusted the united states' motives in afghanistan he said, once bitten, twice shy. natalie? >> thanks so much, atia. >>> a new york city homeless man has been charged with second-degree murder in the death of a man pushed in front of a subway train. 30-year-old naeem davis is being held without bail. he served two years in prison for robbery. on wednesday, the victim's family spoke out. his daughter says she wishes someone had helped her father off the tracks but said, quote, what is done is done. >>> a candle l
that. republicans are holding hostage the middle class in america so that the wealthy don't have to pay their fair share. it is the republicans who are willing to let millions of americans rely upon an informant and insurance, to have that ended for them in just a few short days, people who have been out of work for over six months. republicans are holding them also. it is a manufactured crisis. what we are here to say is, first of all, i hope all of you agree with me, but no deal is better than a bad deal. no deal is better than a deal -- >> we'll take you back to the capitaol now. live coverage on c-span. >> yeah, right here. right here. right here, trust me, right here. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] if we get a deal, who will supply the champagne? >> republicans. they have all the money. >> are all watching somewhere. >> there's one. >> i am going to look for -- back.e rigtht >> senator mccain? can i talk to you out here for a second? [laughter] >> can we quote you on this? >> a man walks up to a podiu
of those who enjoy america's most distinguished motor car. >> reporter: the author john steinbach wrote that no other car so satisfied my soul. bank robber clyde barrow had one though it's not known if he actually paid for it. >> there be a brand new thrill on the highway in 1951. >> reporter: its creators wanted the most luxurious ride with the most beautiful styling of anything on four wheels. something that went well with country clubs, fine wines, and beautiful people. >> my name is pucci. this is the pucci edition mark 4, the first pucci fashion with an engine. >> reporter: the lincoln motor company was founded by henry leyland in 1917. named for abraham lincoln, his hero and the man for whom he cast his first vote in 1864. by 1922 leyland had sold lincoln to henry ford who entrusted his son edsel with the task of turning lincoln into something special. it's a story. edsel ford ii knows well. >> i think quite frankly he wanted this so he could make a mark on the industry. his father was still the president of the company and edsel, i believe, was trying to find his way, trying to f
and why he's frustrated. as we continue the heroic efforts to save america! >> eric: hello. i'm eric bolling with andrea tantaros, bob beckel, dana perino, greg gutfeld. it's 5 verz in new york city. this is "the five." ♪ ♪ >> eric: 22 days until things get weird around here. >> interesting outfit. >> my gosh! >> eric: yes, the dreaded fiscal cliff. tax hike, spending cut and sequestion ration, whatever they are. belly flop the economy at once. comfortabling the know that d.c. is on top of it all. alex simpson, former senator and the guy that everyone thinks is a lifeguard at the fiscal pool. ♪ ♪ >> eric: okay, beckel is gangnam style. good to know we're in good hands but get serious, folks. >> any word from karl rove? >> despite what we're telling you, it's over. romney lost. >> i guess it's time i explain, the good people, the upcoming fiscal cliff. >> the economy is the car and rich sman a driver. don't give the driver many. they will drive you over a cliff. just common sense. >> eric: not exactly. the only way to save the republic is for us to let the president go off the
and it was reported in the airplane today that america will reach the debt limit on december 31st. that needs to be dealt with to maintain the credit worthiness of this nation to give competence to our economy. in addition that, there is much other business to do. over the past several weeks, they said that the house would do the work necessary to finish the items we need to get done by the end of the year. they are having a discussion on that at 2:30 on the call as we concluded and i speak for myself that we must come back as soon as possible we have to be sure to address the legislation that is pending in this congress. congress which i believe has been the least. >> speaking and saying hey, they have to come back as soon as possible. america will reach the debt limit by december 31st. we will keep an eye on that and if it makes news, we will bring it to you. i want to get back down to terry. the example i was talking about that you gave us, a married couple and two kids, combined annual income of $250,000 a year. when the tax hike hits, their two-week take home shrinks by $600. many of the
had on yesterday's, author of "bloch: the rise of america's gun." i asked about senator feinstein's announcement that she will reintroduce the ban on assault weapons on the first of the senate. >> i will read the legislation very closely when it is out. i have to say i'm skeptical. the 1994 so-called assault weapons ban was one of the most porous, ineffective pieces of legislation that i personally have the opportunity to study. it was shot through with loopholes. it had no applicability to weapons that were made and sold on the day before enactment. and the fact it was coming for a period of years gave gun manufacturers an opportunity to run their factories overtime and to build up huge stockpiles of the weapons. so we will see. but if congress is not proposing to ban weapons that are already out there, then that leaves millions and millions of weapons already out there. >> that was paul barrett, author of "glock: the rise of america's gun." rebecca peters, if you could compare to the legislation that was passed in australia after the massacre, and also talked about the buyback a
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have ubs. more litigation heading over these guys. charles: bank of america is up like 100%. i am too afraid of these kind of thanks. i did not like the risk reward. i think there are a lot of on answered questions with what is brewing to meet the surface there. we have morgan stanley as a trade. i do like goldman sachs. i like the comparisons, more than anything else. listening, volume is down. also, we have regulations. at least we know what it is. lower margins because of price transparency. they admit they will lose revenue. all of that stuff is out there. connell: goldman had a settlement of its own on a different story. not love or talk up on on a financial crisis issue. charles: in part because most of the time they were using -- which was a fantastic sign for the stock. will that be a big story next year. charles: you just never know. that is one industry, for whatever reason, they never get a clean bill of health. there is always someone trying to beat the system. you don't think someone will try to figure out a way around basel three. if you configure in around within the ru
are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> president obama captured 55% of the women vote to win re-election. the national organization for women is pressing for the president to appoint women to have of his cabinet. they say there are plenty of qualified women to take those jobs. i'm joined by terry o'neil who is president of now. it's good to see you. >> good to see you. >> 22 cabinets currently in the obama administration, eight are female. 36%. we know that there will be a shakeup as there always is in a second term. why do you think the women -- the president needs to appoint more women? >> well, you know, the reality is study after study has shown that when women have a significant voice, whether it's a country or a state or a county or a town, that in fact what you see are more policies that actually help everyone. so more spending on education and health care lessen spendi
broken branch: how the congress is failing america," "it's worse than it looks how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." he's been quotedded probably too many times for any data base to collect in one place. in the 1990s, there was an article i was in somewhere quoted, and you were quoted, and your quote was i have no idea. i thought to myself, you can get quoted for saying that, you achieved a unique status in washington, d.c.. i congratulate you on that. [laughter] the third speaker will be bill who is currently in the policy public practice, serving assistant to george w. bush in the white house, a policy adviser to bill frist, and chief of staff to joe pitts of pennsylvania. he has a very, very deep experience both in the house and senate, making him unique. he's made of top of the pyramid in both chambers, and he was particularly active at the time on the issues concerning senate rules and precedent. he's working on the sontorum campaign, "culture: upstream from politics," and other series. the fourth and final speaker is brian dar
.s. passport which sadly wynton churchill never used. >> so in other words, as much as churchill loved america, america loved churchill. >> absolutely. and that really is what this exhi business is all about. >> churchill was a great reader and writer of history. he engaged with history. and that's with american history just as much as european history. >> so the bromance between fbr and winston is one of people's favorite stories in the second world war. and here it is, a present from roosevelt to churchill in his 70th birthday. what exactly is it. >> these are lines by abraham lincoln that roosevelt will sent churchill for his 70th birthday and a wonderful inscription where he has written at the bottom for winston on his birthday, i would go even to-- to within him again. >> and church sill someone who lived by his pen. his whole career is underpinned by writing. >> he actually rarely put pen to paper himself. so what is the significance of this typewriter you have in the exhi business. >> are you absolutely write. churchill favorite method of working was by dictation. and this is what was t
which we do to grow the economy, in infrastructure and innovation and making sure america is always on the cutting-edge of new entrepreneurship, the fact is that we want to do that, the president has put that forward, the election does make a difference, the president is absolutely strong about this. look i was just with him on friday. he came to my district. was at a business. they are showing some of that video right now. local business in my district that was a toy manufacturer and what they said to the president, what they said to me is we, we make more toys when there's consumer demand. let's make sure that middle class americans have dollars in their pockets, they continue to have confidence as consumers or grow that confidence and that our businesses, large and small respond to that, that they begin to see so stability. this is time when we're calling on speaker boehner to work with the president, to work with democrats in congress, and to get done what we have to get done, the american people, middle class and businesses, let's create that stability and confidence that this
. the two sons traveled all over the world, including to america, across europe and asia. and ultimately it came to no avail. .. >> it was 20 years after a very bloody partition, and it was a time in government that was a time of great possibility. the country's first constitution was written in 1973. the last land reform you had done were carried out in that period. you had an incredibly progressive government. i just came from england doing a talk there, and it was in the 1970s that marital rape or earlier was considered a crime, but it was something, like, 1984 before the united king dome deemed marital rape a crime. there was a progressive period, not to say it was without fault. certainly, it was made, errors made, grievance ones, in his time. there was the first ever islamic conference, and it was a source of great pride for pakistanis, and they were asked to open up their homes for delegates combing from all over the world, open their home, and make space for them. they had to open their homes because many came uninvited, and there was a substantial entourage that required more sp
: sorry, america. less than 24 hours to go but no deal on the fiscal cliff. why can't lawmakers get it together? we'll ask a master negotiator, donald trump, what is happening in this process in moments. >> clayton: and say good-bye to 2012. we are live in times square with the man in charge of putting on the biggest show of the year. "fox & friends" hour two begins right now. ♪ i'll never ever get back together ♪ ♪ . >> juliet: oh, in honor of dave briggs, this is his last day with us. he's moving on to different pastures. >> clayton: so play his least favorite song? i asked you to send us your least favorite song. that's dave's. mine is "call me maybe". and toba knows it's my birthday. please do not play that song today. that's my only wish. >> juliet: i can't wait to hear "call me maybe." how do you guys not like that? i don't get it. let's get to some headlines. major health scare for secretary of state hillary clinton. she was supposed to be back on the job this week, but instead, she is waking up at new york presbyterian hospital. she's being treated for a blood closet i
of methadone clinic. we'll reenact the two percent . part of the bargain let's get america off of a far more dangerous drug than corn or ethanoyl. it hurts food shoppers and tears up the inside of the engine. >> two wrongs don't make a right. what john was referring to was windmills in places like norway. >> and holland. >> and what is happening the wind sector took off in norway and in denmark. at the samime gerald ford and carter were pushing shell gas development. >> and that was viable. >> and thats 50 percent of what is going on in wind energy and equals the price . you net out 15 percent of the oil. are we making the companies economically profitable or if not. they should be killed off and otherwise we are padding the profits. morgan, you still like solar and what about wind. >> the price of tha is coming down. wind energy let is it lapse and slash a bor corn sib sidies. going back to wind. it is 8,000 percent higher than the cost of natural gas for the same amount of electrical lout put. >> i agree with her on this. >> what is more interesting is what liz said. carter and ford got be
've been hearing about these things. he broke into the woman's home and drove her to the bank of america branch where she worked. she triggered an alarm and the suspect escaped. it took them three hours to remove the device from her neck, she was not hurt. how scary is that. and a newspaper taking heat for publishing names and addresses of gun owners and they're not stop at that, the online maps, list of all people in westchester and rocklands county, in putnam county, the paper claims, but they say, uh-uh, privacy. and dozens of people try to find out and then find themselves in need of a rescue. >> somebody get a branch. >> oh, oh! so you could see one after another, they all start falling into the water. oh, within seconds of each other and chain reaction continuing as more people tried to help out. took ten minutes and luckily people on shore were able to pull everybody out and we can smile about it now because everybody was okay. >> because i was laughing. >> it's pretty comical watching na. look, you can see that ice is thin. don't go out on that. use your head, people. >> clayton:
approval. very different and just the same as america's favorite fish dinner. >> same texture. >> eating frankenfish. >> please don't use that term. >> reporter: the fda won't say when it will give final approval. the company says it could go out of business before it does. jim avila, abc news, washington. >> and they'll run out of money soon, in january of next year. >> a month. >> a matter of weeks from now too. the fda taking its time in getting to the issue. i think most people are at home going ew. >> i don't have a problem necessarily with steroid being injected into the chicken to make them larger. there's a reason that animals were created and supposed to stay exactly how they are. no cross-pollination here. interesting, little chance a salmon could escape and breed. if that happens, bred with wild fish they could disrupt everything. but there's -- >>> if the frankenfish got together with other fish. freaky fish! >> chaos. a freak every now and then. i knew willis would enjoy that. >>> still to come, getting ready for the end of the world. >>> as the countdown to the end of the m
doctor who had an incredible things for america. to make a long story short, he sent general david petraeus and e-mail landon ten minutes got back to me and we had for the next three months general david petraeus, people basically had gone in and worked, the letters had been written to basically create a justification, an exception. three days ago he will be laid to rest in darlington. [applause] >> did dog company receive any proper recognition for what they did? >> i am so pleased many of the family and people that i know very personally are here. bob, you were a member of george company 3 one in the chosen reservoir. part of a book i wrote called give me tomorrow, you were a machine gunner and it is an honor to have you here. like george company, for the most part dog company hasn't received as much recognition as they deserve. they received a presidential citation for their actions at pointe du hoc, but hills 400 remains an open issue. they deserve a presidential citation for that action. they charged that hill and held against all odds. the last letter to tom, one of my main c
. in fact the first place is what discusses here in america, even -- being opposed to slavery itself was remarkable. it's only in the western only in the 18th century that you have an abolition movement. people actually questioning the morality of slavery. so to me, jefferson was remarkable in that he actually questioned the system and had enough empathy to realize that slaves freed would be so angry at the way they were treated that it might actually rebel. i don't know if you want swedish know, i mean, jefferson was wrong about the blacks because when they were freed, there was no general rebellion after 1895. there was no mass slaughter of former masters. jefferson throughout his life, the revolutionary war was, it was a bit of a shock to him because a number of slaves ran off and joined the british to get the freedom. and he never forgave him for that, and that overrode the loyalty that many more slaves adjourned to the american cause. it overrode the fact that, well first of i should mention, george washington integrated the american army in 1775 blogspot throughout the war in w
or the united states of america. mr. speaker, more jobs means that the impact of the weaker than forecast gdp on the public finances have been less than some might have expected. there have been three developments that have each had a significant one-off impact on the public finances, and in the report today we publish clearly and transparently the impacts of all three. first, there is the transfer of the royal mail pension fund to the public sector at part of its privatization. this produces a one-off reduction in the deficit of 28 billion pounds this year, but it adds to the deficit in the years afterwards. second, the previous goth had class -- government had classified northern rock asset management as off balance sheet. today it is brought on balance sheet in line with the office of national statistics. this adds about 70 billion pounds to our national debt and reminds us of the price the country is still paying for the failures of the past. third, the government as decided -- has decided, third, the government has decided with the agreement of the bank of england to transfer excess cash
across america? this is the reality we face? . we sent the bill to him that will protect 98% of american families and he will not call it on the floor. is he waiting for what is going to happen january 1 when consumer confidence is shaken across america, as everyone sees an increase in income-tax rates, including working families because he will not act? is he waiting for the doctors, as of january 1, the reimbursement for doctors goes down 20% -- 27%. is he waiting for that to happen or is he waiting his election to speaker? i hope it is not that. i hope he understands putting this off is not fair to america and is not been for the recovery. it will hurt us as we wait. there is no excuse. there is solid support among republicans and independents and democrats to make sure we protect working families and move forward. now the house is going home again. i do not know what we can accomplish but we certainly have depending on the floor major things that will help america. >> thank you. some other unfinished business, you have all seen on the tv screens the devastation. i have seen storms an
at the white house with just four days left until the deadline. >> they called him stormin norman. america remembering general norman schwarzkopf. >> and have gun, will teach. hundreds of educators get a hands-on lesson in firearms. controversial proposal. good morning. welcome to "early start." 5:00 a.m. in the east. >>> it is the last friday of 2012. i've just had that pointed out to us. one final desperate attempt to dodge the fiscal cliff, just four days left before we go over the edge triggers tax hikes, spending cuts that could send the nation back into recession. the president calling for members of the congress the back. a gang of six attending. vice president biden, harry reid, house minority leader nancy pelosi, mitch mcconnell and john boehner representing the republicans. brianna keilar is live from washington. is anybody optimistic that a deal could be done today around a table? >> i will tell you the optimism is sort of sinking. senate majority leader harry reid said he doesn't see how it can get done by january 1st. we heard from president obama before he left from his vacat
this morning." ñp that ended america's most infamous family feud. the hat fooelds and the mccoys. researchers have now found the first physical remains of the final battle. mark strassmann has the exclusive look of the evidence that could rewrite the history of these hillbilly clans. >> reporter: in these east kentucky hills bob scott's family has owned this land, almost 50 acres, since 1902. it was a stage for a bloody chapter in american history that's also part of his family history, the hatfield/mccoy feud. >> my mother's maiden name was hatfield. >> and this is mccoy property. >> randall mccoy, pate trat of the kentucky clan once lived here and his well sit here's on scott's land. his once enemy was hatfield, leader of the clan. this spot is where they finally ended a generation of fussin', fightin', and killing. sparked by a murder right after the civil war. >> mccoy's brother was a northern soldier. he comes back from the war. hatfield and his family fought for the south. word gout out they were out to get him and they eventually went out and get him. >> reporter: between 1865 and 1868
this week, we hear. and a list of banks targeted includes j.p. morgan chase, bank of america, u.s. bancorp, pnc financial services and suntrust banks. more details when we've got them. the power and might of unions on display today and being tested. you will see huge protests at the state capital building in michigan where right to work legislation will be signed today. that means workers will be able to choose if they want to join the union. they will no longer be compelled to pay dues. here is the president speaking at a daimler factory in michigan yesterday. >> we do everything we can to encourage companies like daimler to keep investing in american workers. and by the way, what we shouldn't do, i just got, what we shouldn't be doing is trying to take away your rights to bargain for better wages. stuart: and take away your rights to bargain. is that what's at stake here? is collective bargaining a right? these are obvious questions, we'll be on it through the program and our cameras are right at the action in lansing, michigan. we're also talking to the mayor of lansing, virg bernaro ne
comes back to us is the substituted compliance, as strict in london as it is in america? it's unusual that the crisis happens in london. mr. cooper, would you like to comment on it? and i will say in basel iii we're hearing from some of our financial institution that is the capital requirements are more onerous on american banks because american regulate, are going to enforce them and many competitors feel they will not enforce it. so this is a problem if someone can go, to another, have a different standard in what is competitive global market in the case of capital requirement requirements. have a situation that is disadvantage to american firms. i'm concerned about the threat to american taxpayers. you can say you have substituted compliance but how are you enforcing the substituted compliance? you hear from some financial institutions, won't say it publicly but don't feel it is regulated in certain places and i'm wondering is london one of them. why are so many financial crises in london? i would like to here from mr. cook. >> i think that will be a very important situation if sub
america ease its enormous debt. and we're learning how north korea deceived the world, to launch a rocket with the ability to strike the u.s. wolf blitzer is off. i'm candy crowley. you're in "the situation room." >>> on the surface, you might think there's new movement toward avoiding the fiscal cliff that starts making an impact just five days from now. president obama is back in washington and plans to meet with congressional leaders tomorrow. and house members have been told to return to the capital sunday. but there's still no evidence this standoff is anywhere close to being resolved. here's our cnn senior congressional correspondent, dana bash. >> reporter: and candy, you know that even speaks to what is going on here, which is virtually nothing. jessica yellin reported in the last hour that our ted barrett, our senate producer, saw harry reid go into mitch mcconnell's office. well, it turns out that reid walked back out, and told ted barrett that they did not talk about the fiscal cliff at all. that sort of defies logic, but so it goes, that's what he said. and it sort of speaks t
's give thanks - for an idea. a grand idea called america. the idea that if you work hard, if you have a dream, if you work with your neighbors... you can do most anything. this led to other ideas like lerty and rock 'n' roll. to free markets, free enterprise, and free refills. it put a man on the moon and a phone in your pocket. our country's gone through a lot over the centuries and a half. but this idea isn't fragile. when times get tough, it rallies us as one. every day, more people believe in the american idea and when they do, the dream comes true. we're grateful to be a part of it. >> sean: welcome back to "hannity." an independent review board releases a staithe -- scathing report on the september 11 attack and places the blame squarely on the state department. reading in part, quote... >> sean: and the report is causing waves in washington. four state department officials have now resigned. according to the a.p., two of them are deputy assistant secretary sharlene lamb and eric bozwell, the assistant secretary of state for diplomatic security. the president is running away fro
and bay anettes. we have assets. we are the united states of america. we did not unleash our military to go in and save those people. despite what the president said, he did not do that. this is not the end by any means. i promise you, as we turn the corner, if hillary clinton is not the secretary of state, i think she still has to come before congress. as a private citizen, she has to come before the united states congress. >> sean: is it possible that the president lied? do you think he consciously lied to save himself for re-election? >> i don't think we have been given the truth. i think we have been misled. lied is a strong word. i want to stick to the facts, but the state department is not being candid with us. we will continue to fight to get the truth. >> sean: liz, is there a difference between misleading someone and lying? >> there is not a difference. what did the president know when he told us repeatedly that it was a video. i hope that there will be subpoenas issued. i think the secretary of state may need to be subpoenaed before she is willing to testify. >> sean: good t
>>> a pleasant hello. i'm kelly wright. welcome to a brand new hour inside america's news headquarters. >> heather: i'm heather childers. topping the news this hour, new york police say they now have a suspect in custody in the death of a man who was shoved in front of a speeding subway train. what police say she told them about the incident, including an apparent motive. will she be charged with a hate crime? details ahead. >> kelly: plus, a wounded warrior walking again inside an amazing new medical body suit. you got to see this, that would make ironman proud. >> heather: and 'tis the season to pop some corks and celebrate the new year. "consumer reports" is here with the best tasting sparkling wines that won't leave you starting out 2013 already in debt. >> kelly: good to see you. >> heather: good to see you. >> kelly: first, we begin with the latest developments in an 11th hour scramble to prevent serious tax hikes and spending cuts that would potentially send the u.s. into another recession. we don't want to see that a. right now senate leaders are trying to assembl
guest: we were in the war. whether clutch came or not america was rages against the japanese, not the germans. the first week pearl harbor. then hitler made the decision to declare war on the united states when he didn't have to and that, churchill realized, meant the end for hitler if the americans went to europe first. the policy of germany first then japan had to be worked out. which is why churchill was in washington that month. i think americans always liked churchill. he had been speaking in america for 20 years. was american. guest: his mother was american. he was well known on the lecture circuit and now here he is as prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing he had an ally and americans took a liking to him because they were very wary of churchill that all he wanted were his colonies become. b not liberty or not roosevelt's four freedoms but to recapture everything the japanese had taken from him by using american boys and that americans resented and they were wary of that host: we are about out of time. when di
that he was here had an impact. we were in the war whether churchill came are not keeping america was a raging against the japanese. not the germans. then hitler made the dunderheaded decision to declare war on the united states when he did not have to. churchill realized what that would mean if the americans looked to your first. the policy of germany first, then japan had be worked out, which is why churchill was in washington that month. i think americans like to churchill. >> his mom was american. >> his mom was american. he was well-known on the lecture circuit. now here he is prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing americans took a liking to him because they were very wary -- and still were many -- that all they wanted were the colonies back. not liberty. not war freedoms. to recapture everything the japanese had taken from them by using american boys. and that americans resented. they were wary of that. as well as george marshall. >> we are about out of time. when did you finish this? >> this is about -- early this ye
nothing of material worth with him, he was too poor. but he had one thing that no one in america had at that time, and it was an extremely valuable and tangible quality. or knowledge, i should say. and that was the knowledge of how to dye silk. there was no silk industry in this country at that time. no one knew how to dye it, they didn't know how to manufacture it, they didn't know how to make the machinery, they didn't have the tools for the man -- machinery, everything was trial and error to try to create a silk industry. it was the upbuilding of our domestic industries. it was our industrial revolution. how do we get in on this trade? there was so much money to be made in silk. and it's hard for us to appreciate today what it meant to our culture back then. but before the age of synthetic fabrics, before the age of designers, silk was the ultimate in style. it represented prestige, prosperity, success. so america wanted its own silk industry. skinner used to say there's not an irish servant girl who comes over to this country whose ambition is not to wear a silk dress. everyone w
in america and has for a long time. >> what are you doing these days? >> i do a lot of thingings. i eat a lot. >> i set myself up. >> what i am liking is wre. i inherited from my mother and buy it for
investment in the americas and in europe will sep accelerate. >> well, i wonder, too, if it's not a move reflecting concern about the health of chinese companies. we've seen what happens with the shanghai xos xwrit. if you're a chinese firm, why not try to put some of your commodities abroad? >> i think you make a point with the shanghai composite. we were discussing earlier on how i think actually you're going to see a trend improvement in 2013 in chinese equity markets and i think they are today one of the cheapest equity markets in the world and there is a whole number of reasons why you should increase your chinese asset now. >> okay. japanese brewery sontori are reportedly looking to add bourbon whiskey to their tab. they were looking at making an offer for the u.s. listed group beam. a little early in the morning to be looking at maker's mark. but japanese companies have been on an m&a spree for the year. nozomu kitadai has more. >> overseas m&a deals by local companies have reached the highest level in more than two decades. according to preliminary figures by m&a advisory firm re
. >>> 7:23. where is the smartest city in north america? one website says san francisco is the second smartest city. san francisco has a lining entrepreneurial economy -- this rhining entrepreneur economy, the report says, but they say it is near colleges and universities. behind san francisco are seattle and vancouver. >>> 7:23. we want to check in with sal. see what's happening on the roads. sal? >> yeah. boston has harvard. >> right. >> let's take a look at what we have. it's cambridge, technically. but you know what i mean. southbound 880, we have slow traffic. we also have slow traffic on the bridges. but not so much on the san mateo bridge as we did yesterday. we want to talk about contra costa county because highway 4 has improved from antioch to pittsburg but slow in bay point. 24 is not that bad. it's crowded, though. and thin 80 westbound in western contra costa county slow in richmond as you drive down to berkeley. if you are driving in san jose, we have slow traffic here coming up from downtown. it's very slow driving up to the 17 interchange and beyond that into cupertino
temperature-wise. in tokyo we're looking at 12 degrees. over towards the americas still things are very messy across much of the southwest. this is due to this winter storm system, and it is going to be a very heavy snowmaker. that will be moving into the four corners. welcoming rain will perhaps be in the phoenix region, but the mountainside will perhaps see about 30 centimeters of snowfall in nevada and new mexico. colorado, you may see more than that, and southern california you'll still see those rain but higher elevations will possibly pack up 5 centimeters of snowfall. across much of the southeast, things are looking very clear and the temperatures are rising here in chicago. that's well above your average. in fact, people in chicago actually broke the record for the longest stretch with no measurable snowfall. you haven't seen snow since rch 4 lt year, so 283 days of no snow. we're wondering when that snow will start there, but freezing rain has impacted paris. it was a slippery day for us out there. still a slippery thing. look at this video. freezing rain creates icy roads yesterday,
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